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A "Combined" Campaign

By 1961, President Kennedy had determined that the program was well-enough established that the President's Committee on Fund Raising within the federal service could be abolished. He did so and assigned the program to John W. Macy, Jr., Chairman of the Civil Service Commission, by Executive Order 10927.

Work on overcoming problems with the program continued. Serious consideration began to be given to both a system of payroll deduction and the possible consolidation of solicitation efforts into a single campaign. There was strong interest on the part of representatives of the voluntary agencies in payroll deduction. However, there was not agreement at this stage on the part of all participants about the desirability of melding the separate identities of the fundraising organizations by consolidation into a single campaign.

In 1964, the first "combined" campaigns, officially called "Combined Federal Campaigns, or CFC" were conducted as experiments in six cities, consolidating all drives into one. The result was a substantial increase in contributions, ranging from 20% to 125%, and a highly favorable response within the federal community: agency managers were pleased with having to deal only with a once-a-year effort; federal employees responded with favor to the single solicitation.

By 1971 all campaigns had become "combined." President Nixon announced on March 3, 1971, that the CFC would be the uniform fundraising method for the federal service. Another major change at the time was the introduction of payroll deduction as a form of charitable contribution. This was made possible only by a truly combined, once-a-year campaign, and greatly increased the size of contributions.

Despite continued skepticism about whether the consolidated character of the CFC suited the fundraising philosophies of some of the major CFC participants, contributions grew dramatically: from $12.9 million in 1964 to $82.8 million in 1979.

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