You are here

History of the CFC

The 1990s

Starting in the fall of 1986 and continuing throughout 1987, the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) met with various interested parties including local federal officials and representatives of the voluntary agencies and the federations. During the course of these discussions OPM identified six areas of immediate concern:

 
 

Expansion

Up through the 1970's, the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) was a relatively non-controversial program in terms of the charities allowed to participate. Growth in the number of participating national charities was slow -- from 23 in 1969 to only 33 in 1979.

 
 

A "Combined" Campaign

By 1961, President Kennedy had determined that the program was well-enough established that the President's Committee on Fund Raising within the federal service could be abolished. He did so and assigned the program to John W. Macy, Jr., Chairman of the Civil Service Commission, by Executive Order 10927.

 
 

President's Committee on Fundraising

As far back as 1948, the then existing Federal Personnel Council (composed of agency personnel directors) attempted to add uniformity and stability to the fundraising effort through the issuance of guidance to departments and agencies. However, the Council had no enforcement authority and the departments and agencies continued generally to follow their own inclinations in the conduct of on-the-job solicitations.

 
 

Early Years

Prior to the 1950's, on-the-job fundraising in the federal workplace was an uncontrolled free-for-all. Agencies, charities, and employees were all ill-used and dissatisfied. Some of the problems cited were:

Quotas for agencies and individuals were freely established and supervisors applied pressure to employees.
Designations were not allowed.
Even with the frequency of on-the-job solicitations, total receipts for charitable causes that were worthy of employee support were minor. In many cases, employees donated their pocket change.